The benefits of mindfulness challenged by new claims

In his latest book, Richard Layard draws attention to a potential lack of altruism in contemporary mindfulness. The implications are profound.

basket blur boy child
If mindfulness reduces altruism could it also lower happiness?

Concerns linked to a lack of reliable evidence supporting the rapid growth of mindfulness are nothing new. Scientists have long complained about theoretical problems and the overstating of preliminary findings. But the key criticism has been that many mindfulness experiments are never replicated. This being a standard practice to establish causality in human behaviour. But new challenges about the relationship between happiness, altruism and brain training are emerging.

man in floral shirt covering his face with his hands sitting between potted yellow flowers

A new book has highlighted a potential problem attracting the attention of the meditation community. In Can we be happier? Evidence and ethics, Baron Richard Layard proposes that altruism mediates happiness. At the same time he acknowledges that mindfulness is accused of reducing altruism when compared to traditional Buddhist meditation. If Layard’s theories are substantiated, the beneficial effects of contemporary forms of mindfulness must be reviewed. In fact, all psychological therapies that reduce altruism will have to be re-evaluated.

Can we be happier? Evidence and ethics is being criticized for a lack of scientific objectivity. Many of the claims made in the book appear to be subjective. But the failure of mindfulness to replicate the implicit nondual aspects of Buddhist meditation has been of concern for over a decade. Meditation is a complex human behaviour, the mechanisms it engages are not yet fully understood by neuroscience or cognitive psychology. Any suggestion that some secular meditation methods can reduce happiness is particularly worrying.

We know relatively little about the long term effects of the practice of mindfulness, either in children or adults. But most experienced Buddhist meditators are aware that a meditation method alone doesn’t guarantee positive results. The ethical context of the meditation and the motivation of the practitioner are crucial to its success. Layard is an economist, not a scientist, so his views on scientific matters need to be treated with caution. But in his defence, he is really only repeating claims made by members of the scientific and academic community over many years.

Mindfulness in Rochester

Mindfulness meditation in Rochester. Eight week course starting in January.

Mindfulness in Rochester
Mindfulness course in Rochester

Mindfulness in Rochester – Public eight week course (January 17th – March 7th, 2019)

Cesare Saguato will be running his next public mindfulness eight week course between the 17th of January and 7th of March, 2019. Some details are copied below but for more information and any general enquiries visit the Cesare Mindful Therapy website.

“Training in mindfulness, like anything needs to be consistent to bring results and that’s what a structured eight week course, complete with group work and individual home practice is designed to do. It is perfect for those who are completely new and those looking to commit more to their current practice with the support of the course, the group and an instructor.

The course will provide you with the opportunity to learn a combination of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Cognitive Therapy techniques, through formal and informal practices that can be easily integrated into your daily life, including mindfulness of eating, breath, bodily sensations, thoughts, feelings, sounds and movement, as well as a number of other positive psychology techniques and thought experiments that support the process.

The Course will be supported by

  • An e-booklet helping you explore and deepen you understanding of the themes covered in your weekly sessions. It will also include weekly Home Practice Guidance and Record Sheets to help you keep track of your progress.

  • Online guided Audio Meditations to guide and support you in your home practice.

  • Email support in between sessions with Cesare to discuss or elucidate any points emerging during your home practice.

  • Certificate of completion (issued only if attendance is 75% or more)”

 

Notes

Header photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

How to reduce stress and blood pressure

How to reduce stress and blood pressure. meditation and mindfulness linked to promising results

How to reduce stress and blood pressure
Looking for help dealing with stress and high blood pressure?

How to reduce stress and blood pressure

I estimate there have been up to 15,000 peer reviewed studies linked to meditation and mindfulness published over the last 40 years. They have offered all kinds of academic and scientific insight. Many claim to signpost potential health and wellbeing breakthroughs, but few are actually replicated (repeated) sufficiently to be regarded as clinically reliable. However I recently came across a study carried out at the Massachusetts General Hospital that offers some interesting evidence that meditation might be able reduce both stress and blood pressure.

How to reduce stress and blood pressure

In a randomised trial one half of the participants followed an eight week course of mindfulness meditation, the other half engaged with traditional stress management training, coupled with some lifestyle advice. At the end of the experiment some members of the mindfulness group were found to have lower levels of the adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stress hormone than the control group (stress hormones can be correlated with high blood pressure). The meditation group also performed better in a mock interview and test scenario specifically designed to raise stress levels. Thereby indicating that mindfulness meditation led to ‘real world’ benefits. In a third finding the meditation group also had a reduced inflammatory reaction to stress, a possible factor linked to Type 2 diabetes.

This investigation offered the first immunological and hormonal data that mindfulness meditation may be able to boost resilience to stress. Some parts of the media hailed this study as a breakthrough. I’m a little more cautious but clearly if we see other experiments achieving the same findings it provides import insights into low cost and effective treatments for stress. However the popularity of mindfulness means that most participants are likely to know something about the reputed effects of meditation ahead of going into a trial, raising concern about the reliability of data derived from these kinds of studies.

Notes

Details of the study can be found here.

Header photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com, meditation photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Mindfulness for wellbeing: Canterbury event

pexels-photo-277035.jpeg

Mindfulness researchers and practitioners from across the south east are being invited to a one day free event by the Eastern ARC and the University of Kent. The day will be structured in two parts, the morning will be given over to presentations explaining the applications of contemporary mindfulness in different contexts. The afternoon sessions will be workshop driven, focusing on skills training.

The event is free, will be based in Keynes College in Canterbury and is open to students, staff, and external partners.

More Details: Visit the Eventbrite website.

Date and time: Fri 20 July 2018, 09:30 – 15:00

Location: Keynes College, Canterbury, CT2 7NP