Katy Perry meditation and anxiety

Katy Perry and how she used meditation to deal with anxiety and stress.

Katy Perry meditation and anxiety
Katy Perry uses meditation to deal with anxiety

Katy Perry meditation and anxiety

In a Newsweek feature from earlier this year Katy Perry revealed in detail how she uses meditation to deal with stress and anxiety. Katy is not the only celebrity to talk openly about the role of meditation in their challenges of day to day living. She has also spoken and written about meditation on numerous occasions. The internationally recognised singer makes some crucial points about meditation reported by the article, in particular that we have to invest in our brain health. While some people may be resilient enough never to suffer from mental health difficulties this is not the common experience. Research is showing that increasing numbers of young people are suffering from depression, and the ranks of adults with dementia is set to double over the next 30 years.

“Brain health impacts on all aspects of our mind and body, meditation is one of the most reliable methods we have to maintain and improve brain function and structure.”

Stephen Gene Morris

Katy goes beyond using meditation to simply cope with her busy life, declaring that the stillness she finds in practice gives her greater mental and physical strength, and enables her to realise her ‘authentic self’. She uses meditation based breathing exercises to gain some instant relief when she feels anxious. According to the report, the particular form of meditation favoured by Katy is Transcendental Meditation (TM), a method brought to the West from India over 60 years ago. Anxiety and stress can impact on different people in different ways and one form of treatment may not suit everyone. But there is growing anecdotal and scientific evidence that regular forms of meditation can have profound and long lasting effects on both stress and anxiety.

If you’d like to attend a meditation class, receive 1 to 1 training, or engage with online meditation guidance get in touch.

 

Notes

Newsweek feature can be found here. Photo by mali maeder on Pexels.com

Dementia help and advice podcast: how close are we to a cure?

Dementia help and advice podcast. A potential cure for dementia

A cure for dementia?
Claims from Australia that we might be closing in on a cure for dementia

I was tipped off about an Australian documentary that featured a potential cure for different forms of dementia. As unlikely as it seemed I thought I would take a look. The short item was on a regular Sunday night show screened on the Nine Network called 60 Minutes. Rather than comment here, listen to the podcast, then take a look at the Youtube clip. I’d be really interested to know what you think.

 

To subscribe to future editions of this free podcast click here.

 

Notes

The feature can be viewed on YouTube. Header photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

A potential cure for dementia?

A leading TV show suggests Australian scientists may be close to a cure for different forms of dementia!

A cure for dementia
A cure for dementia, a cause for celebration.

Australian documentary suggests a cure for dementia may be close

It was my impression that a cure for dementia was some distance away.  Dementia is a complex syndrome that encompasses a number of different illnesses that appear to have both lifestyle and genetic causes. But today my attention was drawn to an episode of 60 minutes, an award winning TV show broadcast on Australia’s Nine network.

Personally I am skeptical of any potential ‘silver bullet’ cure for Alzheimer’s dementia, vascular dementia and different forms of early onset dementia. There is every chance that each of these diverse illnesses has a number of different contributory factors. However when I was told to about the 60 minute video I was happy to watch it with an open mind.  Essentially an Australian scientist has been carrying out research in a small town in Colombia where the residents have a 50% probability of developing early onset dementia, leading to premature death before the age of 50. In identifying a genetic cause for the early onset dementia the researchers felt sure it would open the door to a cure for both vascular and Alzheimer’s dementia within five years. The show was broadcast in 2017 so if the work had progressed I would have expected to see more interest in the project by now. A quick search through the internet failed to find significantly more details than were contained in the actual TV show.

Feel free to take a look at the clip and if anyone out there uncovers more information about this project I’d welcome an email with some details. There is a fine line to tread between sensationalist claims and promising scientific research. I’m not yet sure which category this TV show falls into, take a look and make up your own minds.

Notes

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Mindfulness in Rochester

Mindfulness meditation in Rochester. Eight week course starting in January.

Mindfulness in Rochester
Mindfulness course in Rochester

Mindfulness in Rochester – Public eight week course (January 17th – March 7th, 2019)

Cesare Saguato will be running his next public mindfulness eight week course between the 17th of January and 7th of March, 2019. Some details are copied below but for more information and any general enquiries visit the Cesare Mindful Therapy website.

“Training in mindfulness, like anything needs to be consistent to bring results and that’s what a structured eight week course, complete with group work and individual home practice is designed to do. It is perfect for those who are completely new and those looking to commit more to their current practice with the support of the course, the group and an instructor.

The course will provide you with the opportunity to learn a combination of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Cognitive Therapy techniques, through formal and informal practices that can be easily integrated into your daily life, including mindfulness of eating, breath, bodily sensations, thoughts, feelings, sounds and movement, as well as a number of other positive psychology techniques and thought experiments that support the process.

The Course will be supported by

  • An e-booklet helping you explore and deepen you understanding of the themes covered in your weekly sessions. It will also include weekly Home Practice Guidance and Record Sheets to help you keep track of your progress.

  • Online guided Audio Meditations to guide and support you in your home practice.

  • Email support in between sessions with Cesare to discuss or elucidate any points emerging during your home practice.

  • Certificate of completion (issued only if attendance is 75% or more)”

 

Notes

Header photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Mind wandering, compassion and happiness

Compassionate meditation appears to be linked to increased happy thoughts through mind wandering.

Mind wandering and happiness
Meditation, mind wandering and unhappiness?

Mind wandering compassion and happiness

The Science of meditation and mindfulness recently featured a study that investigated the relationship between mind wandering and how we feel. In particular can mind wandering and spontaneous thought be correlated with happiness and can meditation mediate the effects? So put simply the premise behind this study is that the more mind wandering and day dreaming you do the less happy you are likely to be. A second question asked by the study was do specific forms of meditation and mindfulness decrease mind wandering and therefore contribute to increased happiness.

women s white and black button up collared shirt

On face value this seems like an intuitive experiment, we know that abnormally high levels of mind wandering can reduce our ability to perform tasks. Further that frequent mind wandering to negative or harmful subject matter can lead to mental health issues. But this is a very complex area and one not yet fully understood. The brain nodes associated with mind wandering, the Default Mode Network (DMN) have a range of diverse functions including maintaining our autobiographical memory and making sense of ourselves in relation to the wider world. Reduced activity in the DMN is correlated to increased activity in the task focussed networks (more mind wandering means less task focus and vice versa).

“In conclusion the evidence supports the view that compassionate meditation is able to increase  a tendency to happy thoughts and positive behaviours towards self and others. “

Stephen Gene Morris

Another consideration is that mind wandering can be either a positive or negative experience. The object of mind wandering can be almost anything, a cherished memory from the past, a plan for great success in the future or worries able to generate fear and anxiety. The findings of the featured study indicated that compassion based meditation was able to reduce the negative and increase positive mind wandering in participants. The research also found that the meditators generally experienced an augmentation in  their caring behaviours.

In conclusion the evidence supports the view that compassionate meditation is able to increase  a tendency to happy thoughts and positive behaviours towards self and others.

 

Notes

Review of the study can be found here.

Header photo by Dana Tentis on Pexels.com, smiling photo by bruce mars on Pexels.com

How to reduce stress and blood pressure

How to reduce stress and blood pressure. meditation and mindfulness linked to promising results

How to reduce stress and blood pressure
Looking for help dealing with stress and high blood pressure?

How to reduce stress and blood pressure

I estimate there have been up to 15,000 peer reviewed studies linked to meditation and mindfulness published over the last 40 years. They have offered all kinds of academic and scientific insight. Many claim to signpost potential health and wellbeing breakthroughs, but few are actually replicated (repeated) sufficiently to be regarded as clinically reliable. However I recently came across a study carried out at the Massachusetts General Hospital that offers some interesting evidence that meditation might be able reduce both stress and blood pressure.

How to reduce stress and blood pressure

In a randomised trial one half of the participants followed an eight week course of mindfulness meditation, the other half engaged with traditional stress management training, coupled with some lifestyle advice. At the end of the experiment some members of the mindfulness group were found to have lower levels of the adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stress hormone than the control group (stress hormones can be correlated with high blood pressure). The meditation group also performed better in a mock interview and test scenario specifically designed to raise stress levels. Thereby indicating that mindfulness meditation led to ‘real world’ benefits. In a third finding the meditation group also had a reduced inflammatory reaction to stress, a possible factor linked to Type 2 diabetes.

This investigation offered the first immunological and hormonal data that mindfulness meditation may be able to boost resilience to stress. Some parts of the media hailed this study as a breakthrough. I’m a little more cautious but clearly if we see other experiments achieving the same findings it provides import insights into low cost and effective treatments for stress. However the popularity of mindfulness means that most participants are likely to know something about the reputed effects of meditation ahead of going into a trial, raising concern about the reliability of data derived from these kinds of studies.

Notes

Details of the study can be found here.

Header photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com, meditation photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Mindfulness meditation and panic attacks; Dan Harris and Trevor Noah

Dan Harris suffered a very public panic attack in 2004. Trevor Noah talks to him about meditation mindfulness and how it changed him.

Mindfulness meditation and panic attacks; Dan Harris and Trevor Noah
TV anchor uses mindfulness meditation to overcome panic attack. Dan Harris and Trevor Noah

Mindfulness meditation and panic attacks; Dan Harris and Trevor Noah

Among the more interesting meditation book releases from 2018 is “Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics” written by Dan Harris, Jeff Warren with Carlye Adler. Harris is an ABC news anchor who talks in an interview on The Daily Show about a panic attack he experienced during the Good Morning America broadcast in 2004. Millions saw the attack unfold both live on TV but also as a YouTube clip. Although originally a meditation skeptic, when Harris came into contact with evidence that meditation can lower your blood pressure boost the immune system and lead to functional and structural change in the brain he started to take the idea more seriously.

Harris recounted to fellow TV personality Trevor Noah how the ability to find a secular approach had been important in his meditation journey. But he revealed that mindfulness didn’t solve all of his problems, rather it made him “less of a moron”. He described his own practice as a simple form of breathing meditation accessible to anyone, and that as little as a minute of mindfulness might be worth attempting. In the interview meditation is broadly defined as paying attention to what you are doing, whilst this is not a universally accepted explanation, it does indicate the functional approach the book is trying to promote.

Can meditation make you “less of a moron”?

It’s clear that Dan Harris is a convert to meditation, he speaks in glowing terms about the simplicity of the concept and the ability of mindfulness to deliver real world benefits. His panic attack appears to have been the catalyst to his meditation journey, it may be part of the reason why he talks about meditation in such a down-to-earth and open way. Ending the interview on a lighter note Harris strongly suspects that Donald Trump does not meditate but welcomes enquiries from the President by call or Tweet!