Meditation and brain health

Meditation and brain health, the latest research urges that we prioritize dementia prevention.

Meditation and brain health
Meditation and brain health

The need to prevent dementia highlighted in latest research

The latest large scale research into dementia, Parkinson’s disease and stroke has confirmed that one in two women and one in three men will develop at least one of these diseases during their lifetime. The research offers insight into the long term health of people in their 40s. But in addition to highlighting the stark statistical probability of succumbing to neurodegeneration, the study suggests that delaying the onset of the these illness for 1 – 3 years may reduce the risk of avoiding them altogether by 20% to 50%.

It is widely recognised that a number of lifestyle factors can increase the probability of avoiding dementia. Stopping smoking, adopting a healthy diet and taking regular exercise have long been associated with improved physical and mental health. Recent scientific studies have also given the strongest indications yet that some forms of meditation might be directly reducing the rate at which a brain ages, enabling us to maintain full brain (cognitive) function for longer. We know that cognitive decline begins in our late 20s and early 30s. It will normally be visible by the age of 45. If our cognitive ability continues to shrink through middle age it can lead to a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and eventually even dementia.

“one study revealed that at the age of 50, regular meditators had brains several years younger than non-meditators”

The benefits of mindfulness and meditation

Research has shown that meditation can lead to a slowing of brain ageing and an improvement to certain brain functions such as memory and attention. Although the understanding of how meditation is able to help create new brain structure is still at a preliminary stage. There is compelling evidence that some forms of meditation are related to maintaining, and in some respects improving our brain health. Although brain training (including meditation) can reduces the risk of developing dementia it is just one of a number of things we can do to live longer healthier lives. For a summary of the current advice on taking care of your brain visit the Brain Renewal website.

Canterbury meditation classes for the over 40s

Meditation classes in Canterbury

Canterbury meditation
Meditation for the over 40s in Canterbury

A unique opportunity for meditation and mindfulness in Kent

Cutting edge meditation comes to Canterbury, book a class!

Mind training has been undergoing a revolution over the last decade with different forms of meditation and mindfulness being offered in diverse settings including, schools, prisons and the workplace. However one of the groups least catered for in terms of meditation is adults over 40, even though this age range might get the greatest benefits from regular meditation practice. Scientific research has demonstrated a relationship between regular meditation and improved brain (cognitive) functions such as memory and attention. The first visible signs of cognitive decline tend to be visible during our 40s, and their deterioration can continue for the rest of our lives, potentiality leading to increased cognitive impairment and eventually dementia. However when practiced regularly meditation is linked to maintaining a younger, healthier brain.

“Cognitive decline begins at about the age of 30 perhaps earlier, most people will have visible signs of an ageing brain in their 40s, this decline can ultimately develop into mild cognitive impairment and even dementia!”

The evidence indicates that we start to experience cognitive decline in our late 20s to early 30s, this is described as brain aging and it is progressive process. Today neuroscience has shown that the rate at which a brain ages is connected to our environment as well as our genes. Lifestyle choice such as if we smoke, what we eat and how we live our lives can have a dramatic impact on brain health and the speed of cognitive decline. Recent research demonstrated that regular meditators had brains seven years younger than non meditators at age 50. Neuroscience research has also confirmed that new brain structure can be created throughout our lives.

Trained neuroscientist and meditation researcher Stephen Gene Morris is opening a Brain Renewal Meditation (BRM) class in Canterbury. BRM combines the latest scientific research from cognitive psychology and neuroscience with established meditation

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Latest research, reliable methods, expert knowledge

methods. BRM is based on traditional compassion mind training and mindfulness meditation. The practice is suitable for any adult, requires no prior knowledge or meditation experience. BRM is appropriate for anyone over the age of 18 but it has been created specifically for people of 40 and older.  The meditation is primarily a compassion based practice which means the method is linked to the aspiration to reduce suffering for oneself and other. As Stephen explains “compassion is a reliable method of brain training, it’s been around for a long time, in its BRM configuration it uses the most useful elements of mindfulness and nondual meditation”.

“BRM engages the mechanisms for self interests and wider empathy networks, it promotes brain health and is linked to increasing a positive and engaged outlook.”

To join a class or find out more visit the Brain Renewal Meditation website.

Keep your brain healthy; it’s the only one you’ve got

Evidence indicates that brain structure and function can be maintained and augmented through particular forms of meditation.

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Taking responsibility is the key to brain health

In recent decades psychology and neuroscience have made progress in explaining brain functions and dysfunctions. But we still know far too little about how the human brain ages. In studies linked to meditation and mindfulness the vast majority of research (I’d estimate in excess of 80%) has been undertaken with participants under the age of 25. There is some research interest in people of retirement age and with people suffering from particular health problems. But if you trawl the academic databases for investigations of the effects of meditation on people in the 30 to 65 age range you will find relatively few studies and even fewer reliable conclusions. The irony of this lack of research is that this is the age at which cognitive decline is supposed to happen (from the early 30’s onward). It’s also supposed that dementia typically starts its journey in middle age, perhaps decades before the full symptoms manifest.

A concept that can be found throughout psychology and neuroscience is ‘age related cognitive decline’; the general correlation between age and brain function/structure. It is a pretty uncontroversial idea, we all carry around the stereotype that as we get older we can expect to experience ‘senior moments’, a lowering in cognitive ability. I’m not going to dispute that this does appear to be the pattern. But my experience of meditation is that the rate of cognitive decline is flexible. I’ve seen the transformation in people’s ability to think, problem solve and remember. There is also some evidence from neuroscience to support the premise that decline in cognitive function can be influenced by a range of activities, meditation in particular. This is not to say that meditation may keep your brain forever young, rather that you have a degree of control over how your own brain ages.

Whilst certain forms of meditation do appear to be linked to improved cognitive function, the neuroscience is at a preliminary stage. It’s clear that different forms of meditation have different effects, and meditation isn’t the only thing we can we can do to influence the development of brain function and structure. It should always be considered that just as some activities appear to support brain rejuvenation, others have the opposite effect. Anyone over the age of 30 is likely to benefit from maintaining, and where possible increasing cognitive function, meditation however is a cornerstone of this process. Keeping your body in good shape takes some time, effort and commitment, this is also true of mind training

If you are interested in learning more about how meditation may be able to help keep the brain in better shape, sign up to to this blog or drop us an email. If you’d like to know more about the hard science behind meditation and brain health visit the Science of Meditation website.

Mindfulness for wellbeing: Canterbury event

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Mindfulness researchers and practitioners from across the south east are being invited to a one day free event by the Eastern ARC and the University of Kent. The day will be structured in two parts, the morning will be given over to presentations explaining the applications of contemporary mindfulness in different contexts. The afternoon sessions will be workshop driven, focusing on skills training.

The event is free, will be based in Keynes College in Canterbury and is open to students, staff, and external partners.

More Details: Visit the Eventbrite website.

Date and time: Fri 20 July 2018, 09:30 – 15:00

Location: Keynes College, Canterbury, CT2 7NP

 

 

Mindfulness for runners, Chatham

Like to run? Want to learn mindfulness? A four week course starts this weekend in the Medway towns.

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This weekend will see the start of the four week Mindfulness for Runners course in Chatham Kent.

The course will take place at Fort Amhurst, under the guidance of two experienced and qualified meditation teachers Stuart McLeod and Cesare Saguato. The innovative programme has been designed to;

immerse participants in a range of mindfulness skills and practices and their application to running. Participants will be required to commit to a programme of home practice between sessions to support their learning. Session notes will be provided at the end of each meeting including links to recordings of guided meditations.

 

The course is accessible to runners and meditators of different levels. However all participants should be able to run 5km without frequent stops.

More details, costs, terms and conditions are available from the runzen.co.uk website.

Leading meditation master to teach in Kent

September will welcome a leading international Meditation Master to Rochester.

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A leading Tibetan Meditation Master, Ringu Tulku Rinpoche will be giving an evening lecture in  Rochester this September. The reknown Buddhist teacher, is a former translator to HH the 14th Dali Lama and the founder of the Bodhicharya movement

Rinpoche will be giving public lectures (open to all) on the 24th and 25th September, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Corn Exchange, Northgate, 51-55 Rochester High Street, Kent, ME1 1LS. More details from bodhicharya-kent.org.

Compassion and consumerism

Ethical consumerism. New vegan and vegetarian market in Canterbury, Kent.

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I wanted to share the news that a new weekly vegan market is being set up in Canterbury. From the 1st of July 2018 the Kent Vegan Market will convene on the first Sunday of each month. The venue is the North Lane Car Park and the market will open at 11am and close at 4pm. For more details visit the Kent Vegan Festival Facebook page.

As our own network contains many people engaged in compassionate practice, the level of suffering experienced by both humans and animals is an object of positive concern. Non dual compassion isn’t about taking the weight of universal suffering on our own  shoulders, rather to start to integrate care for others in a practical and sustainable way. There are many reasons why people may choose not to become vegan or vegetarian. But for anyone interested in compassion for self and other, spending a few moments thinking about the impact of what we eat is probably time well spent.

Compassionate consumerism need not be radical. Any attempt to support the environment, encourage ethical, kind and sustainable consumption is a useful activity.

For more information about veganism you can visit the Vegan society.